Part 11: 20 Landing Page Design Examples

If you got this far then you’re clearly one of the smartest marketers out there. Knowing what you know about landing pages puts you head and shoulders above your contemporaries.

So today we take it easy and sit and stare at some really awesome landing page examples. Each one has been selected for it’s excellence in one area or another, and each gets critiqued so you can see what’s good and what needs some A/B testing to iron out the wrinkles.

Enjoy… And be sure to join in down in the comments to let us know what you think.

All landing pages critiqued by Oli Gardner.

1. Right Signature – Signup landing page

Landing Page Example - Right Signature

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What I like

  • Nicely encapsulated form: The first thing you see on this page is the form – it’s beautifully positioned and designed for clarity using the rule of encapsulation. And it will always be above the fold.
  • Clear info about what you’ll get, including freebies for extra incentive: The text beneath the button helps put the visitor at ease by describing what will happen next – and the addition of some free usage is a good incentive to sign up.
  • A headline that describes exactly what the product does: I love this headline. It’s so clear and to the point that you couldn’t fail to understand what the service does instantly.
  • Demonstration of simplicity: The 3-step design below the main area makes it really quick to understand how the service would be used, which will limit the number of bad leads you’ll get as they know what they’re signing up for.
  • High profile testimonials: Big trust factors come from these testimonials and they help describe the benefits at the same time as showing off the exposure the service has received.

Things I’d change or test

  • Nothing!: I could go on all day about why I like this page, but I have too many more to write so I’ll stop now. Great job RightSignature.


2. Monetate – Ebook download landing page

Landing Page Example - Monetate Ebook Download

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What I like

  • Design of eBook image shows professionalism: By having a nicely designed cover you show that time and effort went into it’s creation (as opposed to a boring plain white cover).
  • Simple bullets break down why you would want the eBook: The headline for the bullets “You’ll learn” really sets the tone that it’s useful and listing what you will get out of reading it (as opposed to what’s in it) is a much stronger benefits driven approach.
  • Clear definition in headline of what you’ll get: Sometimes it’s nice with an eBook to know it’s not War and Peace. By limiting this to 10 tips, they stand a good chance of increased conversions by providing an easy to consume resource. While long eBooks can be authoritative, they often go unread.

Things I’d change or test

  • Social sharing location: People are more inclined to share something right after they actually get it. So I’d suggest placing the social sharing buttons on the form confirmation page. This also has the benefit of removing distractions from the main page.
  • Preview: People react well to the psychology of try-before-you-buy, so adding a preview of the eBook (first chapter or a few choice pages) would help people know what they are exchanging their personal data for.


3. Alta – iPhone app callback landing page

Alta lead gen landing page

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What I like

  • Crystal clear headline: The headline makes is obvious that they are an iPhone app dev company and the phrasing makes it feel like they’ll take the pressure off your hands and get it built for you (knowing that everyone needs an iPhone app but has no time to build one). Us included :)
  • Action oriented form headline: There’s no dilly dallying with the form header (one of the most important elements of a lead gen page). “Get your project started” inspires you to take action.
  • Client testimonial video: Great testimonial! It has a nice written one coupled with a video. You also get to see what the app is which shows you the quality of their work.
  • Confident benefit statements: All of the statements in the main content area are titled in a way that makes the company sound very confident in their ability = trust x10.
  • Guarantee: A guarantee is always a nice way to lay out a security blanket. iPhone apps are often rejected from the App Store – but they guarantee you entry – big win.

Things I’d change or test

  • Umm, nothing: It’s a great page. I was worried when I saw the contact us button at the bottom (thinking they were mixing click-through with lead gen) but it just pushes the page back up to the form. Nicely done.


4. Manpacks – Online > offline delivery ecommerce click-through landing page

Manpacks ecommerce landing page

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What I like

  • It’s sexy: Predictable response? Yes, absolutely. That’s the whole point.
  • Validation: They jump right into showing off the famous publications that have featured their company. From a design perspective, the grey monotone prevents a mishmash of colour creating any visual distraction from the call to action (CTA).
  • Value propositions: The main content on the page answers two simple questions: “What is it?” and “Why should I care?”
  • Testimonials: The second is one of the funniest I’ve read. Socks as a Service – genius.
  • Removal of doubt: The subtext below the CTA lowers the perceived risk, which can improve the click-through-rate (CTR).

Things I’d change or test

  • Tagline: To make it more immediately clear what the purpose of the page is, I’d add a succinct tagline beside the logo.
  • Main title (core value proposition): There are a couple of ways to use a headline: A) use a very clear statement of what you are offering to enable an understanding of the purpose of your page, or B) entice your visitor to want to keep reading by using a seductive headline. They’ve gone with B here, presumably in an attempt to catch your attention and increase curiosity (or to push a particular button). For a test, I’d try approach A and make it really clear from the get go – what Manpacks is (this would work really well with the tagline to help pass a five second test).


5. PPC Analyzer – Product launch signup landing page

PPC Analyzer landing page

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What I like

  • Use of Copy Highlighting: Highlighting the word inefficient is good, but it draws your attention away from the headline. Which is actually a good thing in this case, as the sub-header is where the meat of the headline is.
  • Encapsulation: The form area is nicely highlighted by the box that draws your eye to it through the use of contrast and encapsulation.
  • Benefit Statements: the page is kept simple in terms of copy, and the 3 points at the bottom of the page focus on benefits, which generally appeal to people more strongly than features.

Things I’d change or test

  • Headline: The headline starts by triggering a psychological fear not to waste money, but it’s only saved by the sub-header to give it any context. Even saying ‘Stop Wasting Money on PPC’, would make it more instantly clear to an impatient visitor.
  • Get the Analysis: Implies that the analysis has already been explained to the visitor. But really, they have to guess what analysis they are going to get. Is it a general analysis? Is it a report based on your website?
  • Beta: After reading that I can get the analysis, the CTA paints the picture that, in reality, I can’t. ALL you are able to do is sign up for the beta – which could imply that you’re just being added to a list and won’t receive an analysis at this time.
  • Highlight: Try highlighting the entire sub-header.


6. Falcon Social – Social media tool click-through landing page

Falcon Social click-through landing page

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What I like

  • Clear Value Proposition That Identifies Target Users: The primary headline explains what the product does, and the secondary header explains the level of users it’s for – teams and enterprise companies.
  • Well Stated & Designed CTA: Tells you exactly what you’ll get – a free trial. It also stands out with stark contrast and stays nicely above the fold.
  • Testimonials & Endorsements: Quotes and logos from big name companies establish trust and the level/size of company the product can handle.
  • Feature/Benefit List Leads to Second CTA: After reading what the product does, you are again prompted with a nicely placed CTA, to sign up for a free trial.

Things I’d change or test

  • Leaks: Remove the link leaks from the footer. The destinations are not comparable to the main CTA and shouldn’t give visitors the chance to wander.
  • Learn More Links: this is a weird one. The CTA’s load in a lightbox, where I would expect them to move you on to another page to sign up. Yet the 6 feature links take you away from the page (more leaks) – when THEY should be the one using lightboxes to expand on the feature details without moving away from the page. I’d reverse this.


7. Givigiv – Charity registration landing page

Givigiv Charity landing page

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What I like

  • Tugs at Your Heartstrings: The photo is emotive, especially with the dog staring you directly in the eye to make a connection and keep you on the page.
  • Guided Process: The 3-step process at the bottom makes it very clear how it all works.

Things I’d change or test

  • What’s the Form For?: There is no heading to the form area to describe the purpose. The description of the purpose of the page is actually right at the bottom of the page – bring this up and make it part of the main header – or connect it to the form so people know what they’ll get for entering.
  • Weak CTA: The CTA doesn’t help matters by simply saying ‘Submit’.
  • No Privacy Policy: If you are collecting an email, always have a privacy policy and ‘no spam’ statement. Ideally stick the privacy policy link beside the email form field.
  • Weak Sub-Header: The sub-header makes you feel good but doesn’t explain the brands’ purpose (which is not obvious from the brand name).
  • Description is Small: The description of what the service (in the grey stripe) is quite small – I’d make this more prominent so that people get the concept right off the bat.


8. Demand Force – Tour appointment callback landing page

Demand Force Landing Page

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What I like

  • As see on!: Right at the top is a testimonial that describes a benefit and associates the product with a third-party authority, and then backs it up with a great quote from the cpmpany showing how it made them extra money (who doesn’t like that!?) – donations taken at Unbounce.com/oli’s-poor/ – They even have an Amazon review :)
  • Market share: they already seem to have a 30% market share – invest.
  • Demonstrate: Love the images that show what the emails and texts look like.

Things I’d change or test

  • Big Form: There are only two required fields, don’t make a visitor feel like they are taking on a long labor to get information. Scale back to just name and phone number. And don’t start the conversation with “Fill in this form. That’s the equivalent of walking into The Gap and being told to try on clothes and then buy them (yeah right, like they fit well).” Seduce, or even coerce, but don’t instruct.
  • Call to action: The visitor isn’t really looking to sign up, they probably will respond more to “Request Tour” or “Get Started”.
  • Footer: The links in the footer, other than Privacy, are just distractions. Get rid of as many leaks as possible to keep conversion high.


9. Cheezburger – I Can Has be Funny?

Cheezburger landing page

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What I like

  • Cheezburgers!!!!! Actually, I hate real cheeseburgers (can’t eat cheese – waaa waaa waaa). Aside from that, I just think it’s awesome that the Cheezburger family is using Unbounce.
  • Content chunking: The page is broken down vertically in a way that makes it easy to digest. They aid getting you back to the top (as it’s a long page) with the classic ^top links at the end of each section.
  • Strong clarity in the value proposition: The headline is simple and inviting and the secondary block of content and CTA explain in simple terms that you can create a free site.
  • Repeated CTA: This is a must have for a long landing page. Here they repeat the CTA (the yellow button) in 3 of the sections to keep enticing you to sign up (this is smart as you don’t know which piece of content will trigger the sign-up response and having a CTA right there will aid conversions.

Things I’d change or test

Nada.


10. Carfax – Report query landing page

Carfax landing page

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What I like

  • Try before you buy: They have a sample report for you to look at right off the bat. This is a great way to develop confidence in your visitors, letting them know what’s in store for them.
  • Straight to the point: The main headline asks a question that immediately weeds out anyone that’s arrived here mistakenly. “Buying a used car?” Why yes! I’m in the right place.
  • Online vs. offline: The page asks for the car’s VIN – but you’ll most likely only get that by looking for it on the car in person – luckily they have a mobile page too so you can do it on a smartphone. Wining points!

Things I’d change or test

  • Nothing. I love this page! They clearly had some smart people architect and design the page.
  • Button copy: Okay, I’d change one minor thing. The CTA should say “View Report” instead of “Go”.


11. Oprah Sweepstakes landing page

Opra Sweepstakes Landing Page

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What I like

  • Media brand match: This is what I talked about at the start. There is a clear correlation between the landing page and the magazine cover. Oprah consistently appears happy, using a strong personal connection (direct eye contact) to make you feel comfortable.

Things I’d change or test

  • Submit: Apparently Oprah’s designers didn’t read my last landing page examples post. The word “Submit” says nothing about what will happen when clicked. I’d change it to a double line CTA that says:

    First line: Subscribe to O magazine
    Second line (smaller text): To be entered in the $25k sweepstakes

  • Headline and sub-header could be better: It’s a double purpose page – subscribe to the magazine and get entered into the sweepstakes. But the headline only says subscribe (not to the magazine) so it could be read as “subscribe to the sweepstakes”. Minor point, but clarity is important. You don’t want have to read all that fine print.


12. Intuit product trial landing page

Intuit Landing Page

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What I like

  • Benefit based headline: Indicates that there are other options out there, but this is a better way to do it. Instead of describing what it does it uses a benefit to enhance the headline.
  • Use of directional cue: Conversion centered design standards (step 11) include using directional cues to aid the persuasive nature of a page – here an arrow is used to point you in the right direction.
  • Descriptive CTA: Obvious that you are going to start a free trial.
  • Social proof: The page is littered with social proof indicators: impressive list of customer logos, security symbols, and an Editor’s Choice award.

Things I’d change or test

  • How much is it? There’s no mention of how much it will cost after the 30-day free trial. A good way to include this is to say: “Free for 30-days then pick a plan starting at $xx”.
  • No credit card required: This is very important information to know, yet it’s buried as small text. I’d recommend making it subtext in the button to reinforce the lack of a signup barrier.


13. Adobe Test & Target – lead gen landing page

Adobe Test & Target Landing Page

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What I like

  • Accidental genius: When the page loads, the form takes about 2 seconds to appear. Clearly being pulled dynamically from a server somewhere. However, what it does is draw your attention to the form as soon as it loads. Personally I love it as a persuasion device.
  • Pixel perfect headline: The use of whitespace around the headline couple with it’s clarity of communication make for a great headline.
  • Hierarchy of content: Adobe break the content nicely into nicely flowing chunks:
    • Page purpose
    • Benefit statement
    • Target market based benefit bullet points
    • Action statement

    Copy this flow of content – it’s really good.

Things I’d change or test

  • The submit button – Jeez: Make it say “Get our Whitepaper”.
  • Required? Make it clear which fields are required, this will make the form appear shorter than it is.


14. Camera+ – iPhone App ecommerce landing page

Camera Plus iPhone App Landing Page

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What I like

This is the modern apple-esque equivalent of the old-school long sales letter landing page. You’ve probably seen the less trustworthy ones before, where the writer uses reams of ultra persuasive copy to convince you that, despite being an average Joe, they have managed to build an online internet business that prints money.

While it borrows the concept of a long page that piles on the features until you’re ready to buy, that’s where the comparison ends.

This is a very good landing page.

  • The design matches the desires and expectations of the buyer. The target customer already has an iPhone, so they are used to seeing beautiful design with apps placed in context with their intended use.
  • Context of use: This is an IMPORTANT concept. The primary iPhone image plays a video showing the app being used. This is pretty much all you need to be sold on the app’s cool factor. You can then explore the big feature list below to reinforce your purchasing decision.
  • The price and call to action to buy the app are nicely positioned above the fold, leaving you to explore the page knowing how to interact when you are ready.
  • Celebrity endorsement: Including celebrity photographer Lisa Bettany – who for the record (and gossip factor) is dating Mashable founder Pete Cashmore – is a clever device to help convince visitors that it’s worth buying. Professional photographers that just want a cool app for their phone will find this convincing.
  • Proof of concept: The photo gallery at the end caps it off nicely by showing that you can take great photos with this app.
  • The reviews beneath the phone are highlighted in red, making them the most important visual aspect of the first screen. While I would normally recommend the CTA get this level of attention, it really pushes you towards what is often the swing vote in a purchase – what other people say.

Things I’d change or test

  • I’d be really interested to A/B test a short version of the page, letting the video do the selling instead of 10 pages of scrolling content.


15. Webtrends Analytics – Lead Gen Landing Page

Webtrends Analytics Lead Gen Landing Page

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What I like

I’ll admit it right off the bat – I have a crush on Webtrends landing pages. If you’re looking anywhere for design inspiration for lead capture forms, this is a good place to start.

  • The hierarchy of page elements and information is well structured and focuses on the basics: a logo, a hero shot that combines a clear headline, a short description of the reason for and benefits of the product/service (in this case a webinar) and a lead capture form to gather visitor data. And… importantly… nothing else.
  • The call to action (CTA) of lead gen forms almost always falls below the fold. To get around this they’ve placed a directional cue (arrow) at the top of the form to point the way to the action area below.

Things I’d change or test

  • A tighter relationship between the directional cue and the CTA. Specifically, I’d make the button blue to match the form header – it blends into the gray background a bit too much right now.
  • Change the CTA to describe what you’ll get when you click it. It should say “Register for webinar” rather than the undescriptive “Submit”. Sorry Webtrends, as much as I love you, this is a rookie mistake that should never be repeated.


16. UPS – Using modal windows to keep visitors on the page

UPS Landing Page

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What I like

Even with a clean and conversion oriented design, many pages still commit the cardinal sin of providing outbound links that aren’t part of the conversion funnel. UPS have done a good job at avoiding this.

  • The “More” links for the speakers all launch modal dialogs (using a Lightbox style). This keeps visitors on the landing page instead of wandering off onto another page – and away from your conversion goal.
  • They have a video. Good! Video is a proven conversion enhancement mechanism. Studies from eyeviewdigital.com report up to 80% improvements in conversion. Video marketing specialists Turn Here highlight good conversion improvement numbers and the side benefit that properly optimized video can be 53 times more likely to reach the front page of Google search results. Tip: you can often re-use your video by placing it on YouTube.

Things I’d change or test

  • The links at the bottom of the page still go to external microsites (click the image to see the full screenshot). Microsite’s still offer a more focused experience than your homepage so it’s not a big negative, however, a better “All In” move would be to embed them in Lightbox windows like they did with the speaker bios.
  • The call to action would be better if it read “Get updates on future webcasts” rather than the generic and intimidating “Sign Up”. (The words might not seem intimidating to wily online veterans like yourself, but it expresses no benefit or gain – making it a negative interaction reinforcement statement).


17. Loop 11 – Online product click-through landing page

Loop 11 Landing Page

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Why I like it

It has a Zebra crossed with a Rhino! How can you not like that?

It’s a very congruent page, where the imagery supports the headline (a new breed). The call to action is very obvious, using conversion design principles (whitespace and contrast) and has text that explains a key benefit (that you can try it for free). The compelling design kept me on the page for a long time and more importantly, made me want to share it with other people. Having a viral quality is a big bonus for a landing page.

Optimization Suggestions

  • Considering the viral quality of the design, I’d like to see some type of “Share This” social media button (Facebook or Twitter).
  • After clicking through to the destination page (a sign up form) – I noticed that the application can be used on an iPad. It would be a great test to have a video on the landing page that plays inside an image of an iPad. Showing the tool in action could provide the extra information required to inspire a sign-up.


18. Smooth Sailing – Live event landing page

Smooth Sailing Landing Page

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Why I like it

Ok, this one’s a touch controversial as it was created by one of the co-founder’s of Unbounce (Carter). I’m including it in this list for two reasons: I like the page and it’s use of social widgets, but re importantly, I couldn’t resist the opportunity to say what I think is wrong with it :)

On the plus side it’s got a great aesthetic, indicative of the genre of music that it’s promoting and it has a wide range of modern landing page features to increase engagement:

  • Video: you can listen to some smooth music while you check out the band list.
  • Social Proof: the Facebook widget shows photos of anyone you know that’s “recommended” the page alongside a count of smooth music fans.
  • Secondary CTA’s: while I wouldn’t typically recommend more than one CTA, you can sometimes benefit from a “safety net” call-to-action. For this the footer has a couple of extra ways to stay in touch.

Optimization suggestions

To keep people on the page longer and enhance the chance of a conversion, I’d suggest the following:

  • Provide a clearly stated secondary headline beneath Smooth Sailing, which describes what the event is. “12 Vancouver Bands Play Yacht Rock Covers from the 70s”. This would make me understand it a lot more quickly.
  • Add a play button beside each band to let you hear an audio preview (a la iTunes).
  • Put a lighter background behind the Facebook widget – right now it’s hard to see.
  • Throw up a lightbox style popup with a Map to the location “The Biltmore” – to prevent people leaving the page to figure it out.


19. Shopify – Online product signup

Note: This one is critiqued by James Gardner (no relation).

Shopify Landing Page

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What I like

  • Video – the use of video really strengthens a brand’s proposition. It’s a great way to communicate a lot of information quickly and clearly.
  • Positive language – Rather than providing lots of copy to ready through, Shopify has created five bullet points. The language used (and the iconography) is all designed to give the user confidence. Phrases such as ‘Easy to use’, ‘Secure’ and ’20,000+ Store’ breed confidence in the user (as does the tick icon).
  • Clear CTA – the CTA is clearly positioned and concise – there are only three fields to complete, lowering barrier to entry and making it more likely that the user will complete sign-up.
  • Supporting information – their supporting information is comprehensive, but delineated from the main sign-up area, so as not to cause confusion or draw the user away from the sign-up process.

Things I’d change or test

  • Shop URL – the inclusion of the shop URL might cause issues. What is it? What do I enter? There’s no explanation as to what is expected from the user. It may be better to include this field later in the sign-up process.


20. American Bullion – Guide download

American Bullion Landing Page

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What I like

  • Descriptive headline: The headline tells you what the page is about in three words.
  • Simple intro paragraph: Describes what you’ll get for completing the form.
  • Perfect form header and CTA: A descriptive form header and button copy.
  • Supporting information: Everything you need to know is pretty much above the fold, but if you’re not convinced then you can check out a large amount of social proof below including: testimonials, media mentions and trust symbols.

Things I’d change or test

The only thing I would add to this page would be a sub-header above the 3 steps to say what they are about: such as “About Gold Investing”.


You Made It!

Wow. Congratulations for completing The Smart Marketers Landing Page Conversion Course. That’s awesome.

See you next time.